Behind the scenes on a corporate video shoot

Behind the scenes on a corporate video shoot

It’s shoot day, and I want to give you a behind the scenes look at one our shoots. Watch the video below and travel with me into central London and meet the crew and take a look at processes we go through on each shoot. Preparation is the key to success.

As a video producer, there are essential things you need for a successful shoot.

  • The first is having a robust backpack.
  • You’ll need a laptop.
  • Also, need a dongle to connect a hard drive to back up all the footage.
  • A call sheet, so the crew know the timings, and the location, and what we’re doing on the shoot.
  • A risk assessment form for health and safety.
  • Release forms for all the people we’re interviewing today.
  • A trusty clipboard so to look official.
  • An umbrella because this is England.
  • And last but not least, an Osmo Pocket, so I can get some behind the scenes footage.

We often shoot in a board room, which is very typical of what we get to film in when we do corporate work. We always try to avoid blank walls and thankfully, today’s camera’s with a prime lens, and some subtle lighting can make any boardroom look good.

After the filming, it is essential to check and back-up the footage. The media cards we shoot on are out your average SD Card and cost hundreds of pounds. So the cards need to be resued. On location on a Tallboy production shoot, we always back up at least twice. Back at the office, the footage is then backed up again onto our editing drive really for us to start post-production. We can then tell the cameraperson that they can reuse the cards for their next shoot.

So that’s a wrap. Hope you’ve enjoyed the behind the scenes of our shoot day.

The Power of Now

The Power of Now

Each Sunday for my video challenge, I am doing a book review, focusing on a book which has made an impact on my life and business. Today’s is not an exception – The Power of Now.

This book as sold millions and I have read it at least three times. This short review will not do the book justice as there is so much it in.

There are so many points in this book. If you read it, you’ll find that some resonate more with you than maybe me but let’s hear three things that I’ve taken away from it.

1. There is no such thing as time. It’s all made up.
2. The past and the future don’t happen. The past is gone; there’s nothing we can do about it. The future is something that we often create in our head.
3. The ego makes us overthink things. If we could stop thinking, I think we’d probably all feel a lot better for it.

The book is about The Now. The only thing we have is the present. I think if we realise that the mind is a superb instrument, it is very powerful but also it can very destructive in the way that we tend to overthink things.

Reading this book has opened my mind onto how I think and how the ego can control the way you do things and how the only thing you can do is be in the present. So I’d like to end on this quote, “Realise deeply that the present moment “is all you ever have. “Make now the primary focus on your life.” I highly recommend this book.

“Realise deeply that the present moment is all you ever have. Make the now the primary focus of your life” – Eckhart Tolle.

Why we use dead cats

Why we use dead cats

Some you may be aware I am posting a video a day for 30-days. 22 days in and I just had to post a cat video – this is why YouTube was invented right? Today’s video is ‘Why we use a dead cat on shoots’.

Why 7-11-4 are important numbers

Why 7-11-4 are important numbers

Day 16 of my video challenge and each Sunday of this month, I am doing a book review. Today’s book review is ‘OverSubscribed’ by Daniel Priestley, and in this video, I am concentrating on the numbers 7,11,4 mentioned in the book and how understanding these can grow your business. I had the privilege of catching up with Daniel on Friday at one of his ‘Dent’ events in London, and I asked him why having multiple touchpoints, content and channels to reach your audience works.

“If you think about the human brain and the way it evolved, it evolved to figure out who in the tribe is a friend, and who in the tribe is potentially a threat. And the way the brain evolved, according to the research, is that the more time we spend together, the more interactions that we have, and the more locations we’ve been together, it’s more likely that you’re part of my tribe and you’re a friend” – Daniel Priestley

The first number, seven. Do you have seven hours of content that someone, if they Googled you, would find seven hours of content they could just gorge on? For example, it could be video. Do you have lots of videos on YouTube? Do you have a book that someone can download and read the book? Do you do a daily, or weekly, or monthly blogs that people can look at? Do you do a weekly or monthly podcast? And what about doing webinars that someone can find and then watch an hour of content as you go through a particular subject?

Then there are the 11 touch points. So this is where someone can visit your website so they can read your blog. Or your Facebook channel and there’ll be a whole lot of videos or posts that they can read. Do have a weekly podcast that they can subscribe. An email list you can send daily or a monthly email newsletter. Or can you host put an event every 90 days?

Then there are the four channels that people can experience you on. So that could be online. So it could be your website (blogs, articles, videos), social media channels (Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, etc.), what about hosting a monthly webinar. Email is another channel to reach your audience. Offline it could be a physical book you have written. Or it could be an event or a workshop where people can come and see you speak.

The idea is that having all these assets in place, people will find you, and it’s all part of the journey how they get to know you, like you and trust you. And eventually, they will buy from you. What assets do you have? How many 7, 11, 4’s do you have?

Video is now

Video is now

Day 10 of my video challenge and today I want to talk about how surprised at the number of businesses who delay producing videos. I understand about maybe not being ready, not enough time or money and other priorities come along, I get all that. The response often is ‘video would be nice to have, but not yet’. Just want to point out video is massive now, driven by social media platforms and mobile devices.
A question for you. Is delaying using video to engage, educate, sell to your audience determinantal to your business?